Bob Higgins

The Generals And Their Ladies

Posted in Politics by Bob Higgins on November 13, 2012
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As ex CIA analyst Ray McGovern pointed out yesterday the only big fish to be hooked in the decade of intrusive monitoring of our private communications turns out to be the head of the CIA. Irony abounds, drips, and oozes.

In addition, General John Allen, a 35 year veteran of the Marines is under investigation in part to determine what’s behind the 20-30,000 emails and other “inappropriate communications” between himself and a woman variously described as a voluntary social liason and socialite from MacDill AFB in Tampa.

That’s twenty or thirty thousand separate communications in two years. Take the low number and divide by a couple of years worth of days and we have a General officer communicating with a socialite party planner nearly thirty times a day. That’s a lot of partying.

Bear in mind that the taxpayers are shelling out over $15,000 dollars a month to to keep this four star naval academy grad at his desk running a major US military command that is currently involved in at least one war and a clutch of other hot conflicts around the world.

His former boss, now retired General and former head of the CIA David Petraeus, is at the apex of whatever comic opera is involved here, along with his biographer, a former military intelligence officer and, it seems now historically noteworthy camp follower named Paula Broadwell.

Petraeus, the darling of the neocons who gave us the war in Iraq, and Broadwell have admitted to having a ten month affair while he was the nation’s top spy. As an enlisted Marine I always thought that generals led boring lives. Who knew?

Like everyone else looking at this national insecurity drama I have no idea what’s going on but I’m pretty sure it goes far beyond Private Beetle Baily planning a weekend kegger at the beach.

Both of these general officers have had long and supposedly stellar careers as senior staff and both are past commanders of CENTCOM. A few more days of the kind of revelations now popping up hourly and they both may be transferred to SITCOM.

Bob Higgins

Related stories:

How to Tell if You’re Involved in the Petraeus Scandal : The New Yorker.

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End The War You Chickenhawks, I’m Running Out Of Friends

Posted in Politics by Bob Higgins on July 18, 2007

I had a fight with a friend yesterday, not a fight actually, more of a one sided shouting match with me doing the shouting. It wasn’t my proudest moment.

He was seated a few barstools away from me in our mutual watering hole and talking to someone else when I heard him say, “We need to fight them over there, so we don’t have to fight them over here.”

I saw red. “There is no “we” involved here, you and little George and all the rest of the chickenhawk pukes that keep repeating that stupid and completely wrong bullshit should be taken out and shot for repeating it.” “And you can take George Bush and stick him up your ass,” I said calmly, at the top of my lungs. Again, it wasn’t my proudest moment, although I thought the argument sound, on it’s face.

Now, I have known this guy for several years and he’s a very decent guy, hard working, fun to be around, I like him in spite of the fact that he thinks he’s a Republican. (That Reagan thing again.) He gets this crap from talk radio. (Bill Cunningham, in his case,)

Normally we joke around and rib each other about politics and it’s all in fun and enjoyable but yesterday I was writing a piece on the National Intelligence Estimate and the crypto Nazi language contained therein. I had been worrying over it all day and by beer thirty I was thoroughly pissed at the State of the Union and, I guess, emotionally locked and loaded.

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At Long Last, Bush Defines Victory in Iraq

Posted in Politics by Bob Higgins on June 1, 2007


Ward and June al Cleaver and their two sons, Walli and Beav al Cleaver shown here in their Baghdad home.
The photo above is said to depict the President’s vision of “the typical Iraqi family in the “post Saddam era, by that I mean the era that is after Saddam,” the President is reported to have said. The photo was leaked exclusively to Worldwide Sawdust by an anonymous but highly placed source who told this reporter that “this will be the President’s final comment on what constitutes victory in Iraq.”

An Iraq that has defeated the terrorists and neutralized the insurgency.

An Iraq that is peaceful, united, stable, democratic, and secure, where Iraqis have the institutions and resources they need to govern themselves justly and provide security for their country.

An Iraq that is a partner in the global war on terror and the fight against the proliferation of weapons of mass destruction, integrated into the international community, an engine for regional economic growth, and proving the fruits of democratic governance to the region.

From the National Strategy for Victory in Iraq – Victory in Iraq Defined

As the President has insisted all along “we are making progress in Iraq,” so in an attempt to assist the pres in explaining his vision for victory I would like to point out some of the ongoing success stories.

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Privatization, Human Sacrifice And The Architects Of War

Posted in Politics by Bob Higgins on March 12, 2007

Appeasing The Gods Of The Shareholders

There was a time when, as a matter of policy, America went to war only as a response to an attack by an aggressor. In 1962 John Kennedy had every reason to make war with Cuba and Russia when Kruschev talked Fidel into parking several dozen Soviet nuclear missiles ten minutes from Washington and 90 miles from spring break.

Most of the Joint Chiefs, especially Curtis Lemay,(General Bat Guano?) along with a sizable faction of Kennedy’s closest advisers urged the President to invade. Lemay wanted to send his B52s, (presumably not to drop leaflets) while others preferred a massive land invasion, perhaps to restore the Cosa Nostra to control of Cuban Casinos, the way God intended.

There is an apocryphal story told that Marine Commandant David Shoup (under whom I served at the time) presented the assemblage of top level civilian and military advisers with an easel containing a map of Cuba, over which he had placed an acetate overlay of a tiny Pacific atoll named Tarawa. Tarawa, which the Marines had invaded early in WW2 was shown graphically as a small speck against the background of Castro’s Caribbean worker’s paradise.

He then proceeded to inform the gathering that the insignificant speck had not been at all pacific, having cost the lives of over 1000 Marines and the wounding of 2200 others, creating a great storm of protest at home over what was seen as a needless squandering of lives to gain a tiny piece of real estate. Tarawa, he is reported to have explained, was defended by 4500 Japanese while Castro would field 150,000, and perhaps as many more.

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